Insect Management and Insecticide Evaluations, 1998

December 4, 1998
Every year a team of entomologists in Illinois conducts applied research on different pest management tactics for field, forage, fruit, and vegetable crops. Mr. John Shaw, a Senior Research Specialist in the Center for Economic Entomology at the Illinois Natural History Survey, is the coordinator for the program and is responsible for carrying out much of the research in the field and analyzing the results. He compiles an annual report that includes plot information, methods, results, and discussion about all of the trials conducted. The 1998 report (Center for Economic Entomology Technical Report No. 13) should be available in time for sale at the 1999 Illinois Crop Protection Technology Conference to be held January 6 and 7, 1999. In the meantime, however, we thought you might be interested in getting a “thumbnail sketch” of some of the types of information we include in the detailed report. Following is a list of articles about field crop insect management research conducted during 1998 that will appear in the report:

  • Efficacy of preplant, planting-time, preemergence, and rescue insecticide treatments for black cutworm control
  • Efficacy of Emamectin 5SC insecticides for black cutworm control
  • Efficacy of seed treatments compared with planting-time insecticides for treatments for black
    cutworm control
  • Efficacy of registered and experimental insecticides to control corn rootworm larvae
  • Efficacy of different formulations of Regent applied at planting to control corn rootworm larvae and first-generation European corn borer
  • Efficacy of seed treatments and registered soil insecticides to control corn rootworm larvae
  • Efficacy of different formulations of the soil insecticide chorpyrifos to control corn rootworm larvae
  • Efficacy of different formulations of the seed treatment Adage to control corn rootworm larvae
  • Efficacy of registered and experimental insecticides for control of first-generation European corn borer
  • The effectiveness of Beauveria bassiana for control of first- and second-generation European corn borer
  • The effectiveness of Bt-corn hybrids for control of European corn borer

    As an example of the type of information included in these annual reports, Tables 1 and 2 provide information about different management tactics for European corn borers. For more information about the research conducted and the details of the report, contact John Shaw at the Center for Economic Entomology, 172 Natural Resources Building, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, (217) 244-5124, jt-shaw@uiuc.edu.


    Table 1. Efficacy of Bt-corn and insecticide-treated non-Bt-corn against European corn borers, Champaign, Illinois, 1998.1



    Hybrid Number

    Corn type

    Insecticide

    Mean cavity length (cm) per plant2

    Mean % plants with cavities2,3

    Garst 8481

    Bt

    none

    0.00 c

    0.00 b

    Garst 8342

    Bt

    none

    0.00 c

    0.00 b

    StarLink 8366

    Bt


    none

    0.07 c

    1.67 b

    Pioneer 33A14

    Bt

    none

    0.05 c

    3.33 b

    Pioneer 34R07

    Bt

    none

    1.33 bc

    13.33 b

    Pioneer 3489

    non-Bt

    Baythroid 24

    3.65 ab

    71.67 a

    Pioneer 3489

    non-Bt

    Warrior T4

    4.68 a

    71.67 a


    Pioneer 3489

    non-Bt


    none

    3.70 ab

    66.67 a

    Garst 8366

    non-Bt

    none

    5.38 a

    65.00 a

    Garst 8481

    non-Bt

    none

    5.93 a

    75.00 a



    1Manual infestation of two European corn borer egg masses per plant (30 plants per plot) was done on July 9—10 for the first generation and August 13—14 for the second generation. Plots were evaluated and harvested on September 17 and yield was determined on October 19.


    2Means in a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different (P = 0.05, Duncan’s New Multiple Range Test).


    3Arcsine square root transformations (data not shown) were performed before analysis.


    4Baythroid 2 (0.031 lb a.i./A) and Warrior T (0.025 lb a.i./A) were banded over the row on July 15 for control of first-generation corn borers and on August 18 for control of second-generation corn borers.





    Table 2. Efficacy of registered and experimental insecticides for control of first-generation European corn borer, Champaign, Illinois, 1998.1



    Treatment

    Rate2

    Placement3

    Mean cavity length (cm) per plant4

    Mean % plants with cavities4,5

    Regent 4SC

    0.05

    broadcast

    0.60 c

    20.0 c

    Warrior T

    0.025

    broadcast

    1.03 bc

    35.0 bc

    DiPel 6469

    6 oz/1,000 ft

    band

    1.15 bc

    35.0 bc

    Regent 80WG

    0.13

    microtube-furrow

    1.90 bc

    42.5 bc

    DiPel 6504

    6 oz/1,000 ft

    band

    1.33 bc

    42.5 bc

    DiPel 6505

    6 oz/1,000 ft

    band

    1.72 bc

    45.0 bc

    Regent 4SC

    0.06

    broadcast

    1.85 bc

    47.5 bc

    Regent 4SC

    0.04

    broadcast

    1.50 bc

    47.5 bc

    DiPel 10G

    6 oz/1,000 ft

    band

    2.63 b

    52.5 b

    Pounce 1.5G

    0.15

    band

    2.50 b

    55.0 ab

    DiPel 6503

    6 oz/1,000 ft

    band

    2.15 bc

    55.0 ab

    Regent 4SC

    0.13

    microtube-furrow

    2.15 bc

    57.5 ab


    Untreated check

    ––

    ––

    4.82 a

    82.5 a





    1Plots were infested in June by placing two European corn borer egg masses (black-head stage) in the whorl of each plant. Plots were evaluated in August.


    2Rates are specified as lb a.i./A, unless noted otherwise.


    3Application through microtube was made at planting; all other treatments were applied on July 15.


    4Means in a column followed by the same letter are not significantly different (P = 0.05, Duncan’s New Multiple Range Test).


    5Arcsine square root transformations (data not shown) were performed before analysis.



  • Author: Kevin Steffey