Extension Bi-State Crops Conferences in and near Western Illinois

Newer and longer-term partnerships between personnel in Illinois and personnel in Missouri and Iowa have resulted in several bi-state crops conferences to be held during January 2017 in Western Illinois or Eastern Iowa.

 

Friday, January 6, 2017: Bi-State Crop Advantage Conference, Burlington, IA, 8:30 AM – 4:00 PM

Location: Comfort Suites, 1708 Stonegate Center Drive, Burlington, IA.

Hosts: Iowa State University and University of Illinois Extension

More Information: Click here to access the flier.

Online Registration: Click here to register

 

Friday, January 27, 2017: Bi-State Crop Advantage Conference, Davenport, IA, 8:30 AM – 4:00 PM

Location: Rhythm City Casino Resort, 7077 Elmore Ave., Davenport, IA

Hosts: Iowa State University and University of Illinois Extension

More Information: Click here to access the flier.

Online Registration: Click here to register.

 

Friday, January 27, 2017: Western Illinois-Northeastern Missouri No-till Crop Management Conference, Quincy, IL, 8:45 AM – 2:00 PM

Location: John Wood Community College, 1301 S. 48th St., Quincy, IL

Hosts: University of Illinois and University of Missouri Extension, Illinois and Missouri NRCS

More Information: Click here to access the flier.

Online Registration: Click here to register.


Nitrogen on Corn in 2016: A First Look

The 2016 cropping season was a good one in Illinois, with planting a little ahead of normal and good May moisture and temperatures to get the crop off to a good start. June was warm and, in most parts of Illinois, drier than normal; parts of western Illinois received less than an inch of rainfall for the month. Temperatures and rainfall returned to normal in July and August, though there was the usual variability from region to region, including much-above-normal rainfall in the southern end of the State.

With good May soil conditions, mineralization got off to a fast start, and the crop in most fields was dark green by the end of May and starting to grow rapidly. Without N loss conditions in June, N from both fertilizer and mineralization stayed in the rooting zone, and N availability to the crop was outstanding. Even no- or low-N strips stayed dark green in trials into the middle of June, much later than we normally see N deficiency developing.

The retention of N in the soil and its availability to the crop carried through the season to diminish the need for fertilizer N. Figure 1 shows a response to N in an on-farm trial in DeWitt County, Illinois. Not only did about 150 lb. of N maximize yield at 230 bushels per acre, but it made almost no difference whether the N was applied in the fall or in the spring. We know from our N tracking that most of the N was in the nitrate form by the time crop uptake started in late May; we can see here that in the absence of N loss (wet) conditions, nitrate stays in the soil and is available for plant uptake just like ammonium.

Figure 1. N responses from fall- and spring-applied anhydrous ammonia in an on-farm trial in DeWitt County, Illinois in 2016. Optimum points are the N rate and yield at the point where the last addition of N provides just enough yield increase to pay for that N.

Figure 1. N responses from fall- and spring-applied anhydrous ammonia in an on-farm trial in DeWitt County, Illinois in 2016. Optimum points are the N rate and yield at the point where the last addition of N provides just enough yield increase to pay for that N.

 

Dan Schaefer of IFCA coordinated dozens of on-farm trials similar to the one shown in Figure 1. Some had fall versus spring N timing comparisons, some had all early versus some early plus sidedress, and others just compared yields at different N rates. Figure 2 shows results from 26 trials conducted across central Illinois in 2016.

 

Figure 2. N responses from 26 N rate trials in corn following soybean in central Illinois, 2016. Each line connects the data points from one trial, and the optimum points (triangles) are calculated from curves (not shown) fitted to the data. The MRTN points are calculated as the yield at 175 lb N/acre, which is the MRTN (optimum N rate) calculated for central Illinois corn following soybeans at a N to corn price ratio of 0.1 ($0.375/lb. of N and $3.75/bushel of corn.)

Figure 2. N responses from 26 N rate trials in corn following soybean in central Illinois, 2016. Each line connects the data points from one trial, and the optimum points (triangles) are calculated from curves (not shown) fitted to the data. The MRTN points are calculated as the yield at 175 lb N/acre, which is the MRTN (optimum N rate) calculated for central Illinois corn following soybeans at a N to corn price ratio of 0.1 ($0.375/lb. of N and $3.75/bushel of corn.)

In 2015, high N loss conditions and damage from standing water resulted in high optimum N rates. In 2016 we found just the opposite: Figure 2 shows that relatively low rates of N were needed to maximize yield in nearly every case. Of the 26 trials, only five had an optimum N rate higher than the MRTN rate, and on average across trials, only 150 lb. of N was needed to produce an average yield at the optimum N rate of 225 bushels per acre. Some like to calculate “efficiency” of (fertilizer) N by dividing yield by N rate; here, we calculate a very high efficiency of 2/3rds of a lb. of N per bushel of yield, or 1.5 bushels per lb. of N used.

We ran a new study at a number of sites this year to compare the application of N rates at planting to keeping 50 lb. of N back and applying it dribbled next to the row at tasseling. Figure 3 shows the results of the corn following soybean trial at Urbana.

 

Figure 3. Response to N applied as UAN at planting (early) compared to applying all but 50 lb. of N at planting them dribbling the remaining 50 lb. next to the row at tasseling.

Figure 3. Response to N applied as UAN at planting (early) compared to applying all but 50 lb. of N at planting them dribbling the remaining 50 lb. next to the row at tasseling.

Responses to late-split timing of N at other sites were all similar to that in the trial shown in Figure 3. We had three corn following corn trials and four corn following soybean trials, and in none of them did keeping back 50 lb. of N to apply late provide a benefit to either yield or return to N; that is, late-split application did not pay the added application cost. This makes sense given the low N loss conditions in 2016. We would expect to see some loss and possible response to late supplemental N following a wet June, though we did not see much response to a single treatment (150 lb. N early versus 100 early and 50 at tasseling) in 2015.

We’re seeing N “at its best” in 2016; it was there in abundance when the crop needed it, and adding the supply of N from soil organic matter meant that the crop needed less fertilizer N than it has typically needed, even at high yield levels. We can’t depend on this to happen in 2017, but we see clearly that the common idea that “high yields require high N rates” often does not hold true. There is certainly no need to raise rates for next year, and fields that received more N than was needed in 2016 (according to N response curves that is probably most fields) might have added to the pool of soil N that can be tapped by the 2017 crop, whether that’s corn or soybean. Keep in mind, though, that what we saw in 2016 was mostly a response to the (June) weather and crop off to a good start; we will need to watch how things develop in the spring of 2017 to know if we’ll have a repeat.

 


2016 Ewing Agronomy Field Day – July 28

We invite everyone to the University of Illinois Extension Ewing Agronomy Field Day Thursday, July 28, 2016 starting at 9 a.m. at the Ewing Demonstration Center.  Every growing season presents challenges to production, and this year is no exception!  We are happy to host this summer field day to share with local growers current, ongoing agronomy field research, including cover crop trials on corn and soybeans, nitrogen management in corn, soybean variety trial and row spacing study, ornamental corn and pumpkin variety trials, pumpkin pest management trials, and our continuous no-till area, now in its 48th year of continuous no-till production.

 

The topics to be discussed at Field Day include:

 

Managing Nitrogen for Corn

  • Emerson Nafziger, Extension Crop Specialist, University of Illinois

The Effects of Cover Crops on Water Quality & Nutrient Cycling in Southern Illinois

  • Karl Williard, Professor, Forestry, Southern Illinois University

Weather Trends & Soils

  • Duane Friend, Extension Educator, University of Illinois

Definition of Insanity & Weed Management

  • Ron Krausz, Manager, Southern Illinois University Belleville Research Center

Exploring New Clover Cover Crops for Corn

  • Nathan Johanning, Extension Educator, University of Illinois

 

The field day is free and open to anyone interested and lunch will be providedCertified Crop Advisor CEUs will also be offered.  The Ewing Demonstration Center is about 20 minutes south of Mt. Vernon located at 16132 N. Ewing Rd; Ewing, IL 62836, on the north edge of the village of Ewing, north of the Ewing Grade School on north Ewing Road.  Watch for signs.

To help us provide adequate lunch and materials please RSVP to the University of Illinois Extension Office in Franklin County at 618-439-3178 by Monday, July 25.  We hope to see you all there!


Ewing Demonstration Center Fall Field Day – September 10th

The University of Illinois Extension will host its annual Ewing Demonstration Center Fall Field Day on Thursday, September 10, 2015 at 9:00 a.m.  The Ewing Demonstration Center is located in southern Illinois about 20 miles south of Mt. Vernon at 16132 N. Ewing Rd; Ewing, IL 62836.  It is on the north edge of the village of Ewing, north of the Ewing Grade School on north Ewing Road.  Watch for signs.

The ongoing research this year includes trials on soybean cover crops, nitrogen management in corn, corn maturity, corn seeding rates, soybean seed treatments, and a pumpkin variety trial.

 

The topics to be discussed at Field Day include:

 

Soybean Weed Management

  • Ron Krausz, Manager, SIU Belleville Research Center

2015 Cropping Season Challenges

  • Emerson Nafziger, Extension Crop Specialist, University of Illinois

Planning Ahead for the 2016 Wheat Crop

  • Robert Bellm, Extension Educator, University of Illinois

Results of 2015 Corn and Soybean Insect Surveys: Implications for 2016

  • Mike Gray, Extension Entomologist, University of Illinois

Making the Most of Prevent Plant Acres with Cover Crops

  • Nathan Johanning, Extension Educator, University of Illinois

 

The field day is free and open to anyone interested and lunch will be provided.  Certified Crop Advisor CEUs will also be offered (CM –  1.0, PM – 1.0, SW – 0.5).  For additional information, contact Nathan Johanning (618-687-1727; njohann@illinois.edu) or Marc Lamczyk (618-439-3178; lamczyk@illinois.edu).


Brownstown Agronomy Research Center Field Day – August 5, 2015

The 2015 Brownstown Agronomy Research Center Field Day, presented by the University Of Illinois Department Of Crop Sciences, will be held on Wednesday, August 5. Extension researchers and specialists will address issues pertinent to the current growing season. The tour will start at 8 a.m. and will last approximately three hours. It will be followed by lunch provided by U of I Extension. 2.5 hours of Certified Crop Adviser CEUs have been approved.

Shaded tour wagons will take participants to each stop. These topics will be addressed:

  • 2015 Cropping Season Challenges – Dr. Emerson Nafziger, U of I
  • Weed Management: The Simple Days are Over – Dr. Aaron Hager, U of I
  • Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome – Dr. Angie Peltier, U of I
  • Update on Statewide Insect Surveys & Potential Implications – Dr. Mike Gray, U of I
  • Factors Contributing to a Healthy Soil – Russ Higgins, U of I

The 208-acre Brownstown Agronomy Research Center has been conducting crop research on the claypan soils of southern Illinois since 1937. More than 30 research and demonstration projects are conducted at the Center each year. Visitors are always welcome.

The research center is located south of Brownstown on IL Route 185, approximately 4 miles east of the IL Route 40/185 junction.

For more information, contact Robert Bellm (618-427-3349); rcbellm@illinois.edu
Visit us on the web at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/barc/


Corn and Nitrogen as Rains Continue

Some rain has fallen somewhere in Illinois nearly every day for the past 3 weeks, and rainfall totals for this period exceed 7 inches – two to three times normal – over more than half of the state (Figure 1). This has a lot of people wondering if enough nitrogen remains in the soil to supply the corn crop.

Figure 1. Illinois rainfall from May 26 through June 18, 2015.

Figure 1. Illinois rainfall from May 26 through June 18, 2015.

Daily high temperatures have averaged close to normal over the past three weeks, while night temperatures have been 3 to 4 degrees above normal, so growing degree accumulation rates remain high. Sunshine amounts have been marginal, but growing conditions have been good enough to keep the crop coming along rapidly. Fields that were planted in April in central Illinois have 10 to 13 leaves, and the crop is 4 to 5 feet tall or more and growing rapidly, adding 3 or more inches of height per day and adding a new leaf every two days or so. With warm temperatures during June and plenty of water, we can expect corn plants to be tall this year.

Except where roots have been in water for a week or more, fields and parts of fields where crop roots are still supplied with oxygen continue to show good canopy color. Much of the early-planted crop is in or about to enter the rapid N uptake period – from about V9 through tasseling – during which the crop takes up as much as 6 or 7 lb of N per acre per day.

We are continuing to monitor soil N in the N-tracking study that I described here on May 30 http://bulletin.ipm.illinois.edu/?p=3241. The most recent samples for which we have numbers were taken last week, before the end of the current deluge. Table 1 gives rainfall amounts and changes in soil N between samples taken May 20-22 and those taken 18 to 20 days later. The 340 lb found following fall application on the first date at Urbana is 85 lb more than was found 9 days earlier, and is likely a result of sampling variability.

Table 1. Rainfall and changes in soil N between two dates at three Illinois sites in 2015.

Table 1. Rainfall and changes in soil N between two dates at three Illinois sites in 2015.

We know these numbers are variable and that we need to be cautious in using them, but the fact that soil N didn’t decrease sharply, especially at Urbana where so much rain fell, provides some confidence that losses have not been very high. The crop at Urbana is ahead of those at the other two sites, and so has taken up more N; I would estimate N uptake by the time of the second sampling (June 12) at about 40 lb of N per acre.

Fig 1 soil NThe percentage of N found as ammonium increased over this period at DeKalb and Urbana, but not at Monmouth, where ammonium percentage was higher on the first date than at the other sites. This may reflect an increase in mineralization as soils warmed up, and could also reflect some loss of nitrate. Mineralization is the likely cause of the uptick in soil N in the zero-N checks as well.

As plants begin to take up N at a rapid rate, we can expect soil N to drop, though N losses and mineralization will both affect the rate of change. Over the next few weeks, we expect that the plants (canopy color) will be a better gauge of N availability to the plant than will amounts of N we measure in the soil. The question that remains, without a solid answer, is whether N levels might slip below those needed to maintain crop growth before uptake starts to slow. From what we’re seeing so far that seems unlikely, at least if rains slow before too many more days.

A more immediate question is whether the pale green or yellow spots in fields need N applied now in order to prevent serious yield loss. Rapid loss of color in places where water stands comes from loss of root ability to take up N, not from loss of N from the soil. We know this because parts of fields where roots are in aerated soil are not showing deficiency.

We won’t know the extent to which roots of plants in wet or flooded soils will recover until soils dry and re-aerate enough for root function to return. Adding N before then will do nothing for the plants, and if soils remain wet or flooded, some of this N will be lost before the plant has a chance to take it up. Aerial application of urea is not inexpensive, and while it can test our patience, waiting until soils dry out for a week or more before deciding that more N is needed is the best course of action. Our hope is that a lot of acres will return to green once soils dry out. Even if that happens, we expect such areas to have lost yield potential, and the larger the plants were when first flooded and the longer soils stay wet, the larger will be the loss. Adding N now will do nothing to fix this.

As plant size and leaf area increase, the ability of the crop to help move water from the soil to the air will increase as well, so the crop itself will help to dry the soils and will speed progress toward aerated soil conditions. Water loss in yellow, root-damaged corn that is standing in wet soils is very slow, so we won’t see much help there. Our best hope is to get two weeks of weather without much rain and with average temperatures to help get the crop back on track. It won’t be an easy wait.


Tracking Soil Nitrogen – Does Corn Have Enough N?

Rainfall in April and May has been about average through most of Illinois, at least until the downpours the last days of May. This has allowed timely planting and a good start to the crop in most areas, and has allowed nitrogen management to be carried out more or less as planned by most producers. Warm temperatures during some weeks of May are moving crop development along, and much of the N planned for application after crop emergence has already been applied.

Much of the rainfall has come with low or moderate intensity; there have been few multiple-inch downpours leading to standing water and fears of crop damage and of loss of nitrogen, though rain on May 30 has been heavy in places. But reapplying N late or using higher rates due to expectations of N loss happen every year, and while that might be less common this year, it remains a consideration.

To find out if more N is justified, we initiated a new study this year, funded by NREC, to “track” N applied at different times and forms to see how much N remains in the soil and available to the crop through the vegetative growth period. At four research center sites in central and northern Illinois, we applied 200 lb of N in four different ways: 1) as NH3 applied in November 2014; 2) as 100 lb NH3 last fall + 50 lb UAN at planting + 50 lb UAN as V5-V6 sidedress; 3) as NH3 applied in early-mid April; and 4) as 50 lb UAN at planting + 150 lb UAN at V5-V6 sidedress. The 200-lb rate is higher than the N rate calculator rate, which is about 160 lb N for corn following soybean; our objective is to track N over time. Beginning after the fall application and about every 10 days this spring, we have been sampling soil to 2 feet deep, with samples analyzed for both nitrate and ammonium.

Figure 1 shows how much soil N (nitrate plus ammonium) we’ve found at the Urbana site in samples taken so far. Sampling like this always finds a fair amount of variability – we don’t know exactly where the N ended up in the soil, and soil probes don’t always get a representative sample. But we did find more N in plots where we had applied N, and we are able to see changes in soil N as the soils have warmed up and mineralization has kicked in. About as much fall-applied NH3 remains available as spring-applied NH3; both show at least 250 lb of available N in the top two feet on May 22. We think this confirms that N losses have been small since last fall.

Figure 1. Soil N at different sampling times in an N-tracking trial at Urbana in 2015. Fall NH3 was applied before the November 14 sampling, early spring NH3 before the April 7 sampling, and planting-time applications (as UAN) were made before the April 24 sampling. Pl is planting time and SD is sidedress, which was done after the May 22 sampling. The 2014 crop was soybean, and corn was planted on April 23.

Figure 1. Soil N at different sampling times in an N-tracking trial at Urbana in 2015. Fall NH3 was applied before the November 14 sampling, early spring NH3 before the April 7 sampling, and planting-time applications (as UAN) were made before the April 24 sampling. Pl is planting time and SD is sidedress, which was done after the May 22 sampling. The 2014 crop was soybean, and corn was planted on April 23.

One surprise at this site has been the relatively large amount of N found in the soil where no fertilizer N was applied. In soils with a good amount of organic matter we never expect to find zero N, but we would not have expected to find the 130 to 180 lb of N that we found in the last three (May) samples. Still, getting yields of 125 to 150 bushels per acre in corn following soybean without N fertilizer is not unusual, and so finding this amount of N may not be abnormal.
The findings at DeKalb and Monmouth are similar to those at Urbana, though the soil N levels are a little lower at the other sites, in part because they were last sampled a little earlier than at Urbana. Soil N without N fertilizer has yet reached only about 100 lb per acre at those two sites. At the Perry site, with soils lower in organic matter, levels of soil N we have been finding are considerably less than at the other three sites; at the May 22 sampling at Perry, we found only about 150 lb of soil N in both the fall- and spring-applied NH3.

The majority of the soil N is now in the nitrate form, regardless of what form was applied (Figure 2.) This is more or less as we expected for fall-applied NH3 and for spring-applied UAN, but by about six weeks after early spring NH3 application (done on April 6) we might have expected a little more of the N to still be in the ammonium form. As expected, most of the N found in plots without N fertilizer was in the nitrate form regardless of when sampling was done. Mineralization releases ammonium, but under the soil temperatures that increase mineralization rates, the ammonium converts to nitrate quickly.

Percentage of soil N present as nitrate following different N treatments and at different sampling times at Urbana. The rest of the N was present as ammonium.

Percentage of soil N present as nitrate following different N treatments and at different sampling times at Urbana. The rest of the N was present as ammonium.

The takeaway message from what we’ve found so far in this project is that we see no reason to adjust upward the total amount of N applied due to concerns about N loss. The fertilizer N that was applied is mostly present as plant uptakes begins, and we can add to that the N coming from soil organic matter. It’s also encouraging that the amount we’re finding has continued to increase as we move into the N uptake period. Last year we found that the crop took up a total of less than 1 lb of N per bushel of yield, so we don’t see a shortage for the crop coming anytime soon.

As part of this project we are also working with Dan Schaefer (IFCA) to sample several on-farm sites with similar treatments, and we’re sampling following spring N applications at two southern Illinois sites. We’ll keep you posted on what we find in the coming weeks.


Nitrogen Management – Avoiding Ammonia Injury

A lot of anhydrous ammonia is going on this spring, and in many fields the hope is to plant as soon as practicable after NH3 application. This brings up the question about potential for NH3 damage to seeds and seedlings.

Seed and seedling damage from spring-applied NH3 is relatively rare in Illinois, but it can be quite damaging, and we want to minimize the chances of it happening. Such damage is rare is because NH3 converts readily in soil to the ammonium form (NH4+) which is held on soil exchange sites and is not damaging to plant tissue. If soils are moist at the time of application and there is normal rainfall (or at least an inch or so) from NH3 application through the time of crop emergence and establishment, chances of damage are close to zero.

A small amount of NH3 remains as free ammonia instead of converting to ammonium right away, due mostly to the large increase of pH that accompanies conversion of ammonia to ammonium. If placement is shallow or if soils dry out, some ammonia can end up in the seeding or rooting zone. If you can smell ammonia at the soil surface near the row at or after planting and soils are dry, there may be enough to cause damage. Free ammonia is very toxic to young plant tissue, and if seeds are planted into, or roots grow into, a soil zone where there is ammonia, damage can result. The most common damage is death of young roots, and this can affect yield if root systems don’t fully recover.

The best way to avoid the potential for damage is to physically separate the NH3 and the seed by placing NH3 between rows or row locations. This is possible using GPS (probably RTK) and autosteer, but it means that NH3 needs to be applied parallel (not at an angle) to the rows, and application and planting need to be precise in order to avoid placing any rows right over the ammonia band. If this can be done accurately, planting can take place right after, during, or before NH3 application.

Physically separating NH3 from the seedling zone by placing NH3 deep can help, but does not eliminate the possibility of damage. Deep placement (8 to 10 inches deep) takes more power and it can be difficult to maintain uniformity of depth across wide bars. Deep placement in the spring also means placement into wetter soil. With its very high solubility, NH3 moves less distance away from the point of release in wet soils than in drier soils. This increases the concentration of ammonia in the soil, and increases the amount that might move up if soils dry to that depth. The “path” left by a knife running in wet soil is more open for upward movement of NH3, and this can increase potential for plant damage.

If it’s not possible to apply NH3 between (the eventual) rows, then separating application from planting by time can reduce damage potential. The idea is to apply NH3 early enough so that enough rainfall will occur to keep NH3 out of the seedling zone. This means relying on weather probabilities, but not certainties; there have even been some instances of plant damage from fall-applied NH3. But the chances of such damage are low, and if this is the only option, then the longer you can wait between application and planting the better. The old rule of thumb – to wait 1 to 2 weeks between application and planting – is better than waiting 1 to 2 days, but not as good as waiting a month. So as long as we understand that waiting a week or two decreases but does not eliminate the odds of injury, it’s a guideline we can live with.


Spring Cover Crop Field Day March 26th – Ewing Demonstration Center

Join us on Thursday, March 26th, 2015 for the  Spring Cover Crop Field Day at the University of Illinois Extension Ewing Demonstration Center.  Registration will start at 8:30 a.m. and the program will begin at 9:00 a.m., rain or shine.  The Ewing Demonstration Center is located at 16132 N. Ewing Rd; Ewing, IL 62836, on the north edge of the village of Ewing, north of the Ewing Grade School on north Ewing Road.  Watch for signs.

Cover crops have many benefits to the soil, environment, and overall crop production and management.  Topics covered during this field day program include:

Challenges of Grazing Lush Spring Forage

–          Travis Meteer, Extension Educator, U of I Extension

Techniques for Planting into Cover Crop Residue

–          Mike Plumer, Private Consultant

Understanding the Soil Profile Beneath Your Feet

–          Bryan Fitch, Resource Soil Scientist, NRCS

Which One to Choose? Cover Crop Species Selection and Demonstration Trial Tour

–          Nathan Johanning, Extension Educator, U of I Extension

Some of the program highlights will be the demonstration trial planting of cover crops, including 17 different cover crops and combinations illustrating first hand the characteristics of the cover crops and what benefits they bring to your soil and crop production system.  Also, (weather and soil conditions permitting) we will have a soil pit dug, exposing the soil profile, where NRCS Resource Soil Scientist, Bryan Fitch will lead us through the characteristics of our southern Illinois soils to enhance understanding of the importance of a healthy soil.  Also Certified Crop Advisor CEU credits will be available (2.0 Soil & Water Management & 1.0 Crop Management) for the program.

This field day will be free and open to anyone interested in learning more about cover crops.  A light lunch will be provided and this is a great way to talk to fellow growers to learn more from their challenges and successes incorporating cover crops into their cropping systems.  Please call the Franklin County Extension Office at 618-439-3178 for more information and to register by March 24th.  We hope to see you there!


Brownstown Agronomy Research Center Cover Crop Field Day – Nov. 13

Mult-species cover crops

Mult-species cover crop trial - Brownstown Agronomy Research Center

 

University of Illinois Extension and the Fayette County SWCD are hosting a Cover Crop Field Day on Thursday, November 13, 2014 from 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. The field day will be held at the U of I Brownstown Agronomy Research Center, 1588 IL 185, Brownstown, IL (Directions here).

The field day will include tours of the current cover crop research trials being conducted at the Center. Extension educators and NRCS field staff will be on hand to discuss cover crop species selection, the effects of planting date and seeding method on cover crop establishment, factors influencing soil health, as will share their experience on the challenges and successes of cover crop establishment. 2.0 CCA-CEU credits in Soil & Water Management have been requested.

For more information, contact:

Robert Bellm,  U of I Extension
618-427-3349  rcbellm@illinois.edu
http://web.extension/illinois.edu/barc

Tony Pals, Fayette County SWCD
618-283-1095, ext. 3  tony.pals@il.nacdnet.net