Wheat disease updates in Illinois

Wheat development in most in Southern Illinois fields is between Feekes growth stage (FGS) 9-10.5.1. Wheat in the central portion of the stage varies from FGS 6-9.

Stripe rust was detected in Eastern Madison County as of 5.5.20, and conditions are favorable for disease development and spread.  This is a cool season disease that loves wet weather and temperatures in the high 40’s through the mid 60’s.  Fields should be scouted for the disease, keeping in mind that it often starts in small pockets, or epicenters in a field, and may not be widespread.

Remember that products for head blight suppression also work on stripe rust (example for a late-arriving epidemic below).  If disease arrives prior to heading on a susceptible variety, you may need to consider

Example of fungicide effects on a wheat variety susceptible to stripe rust. Different letters within a column indicate significant treatment differences using Tukey’s HSD (0.05).   In this trial conducted at the Wye, MD, stripe rust signs and symptoms began at the start of heading, and cool wet weather persisted well past flowering. From Kleczewski, 2017.

Wet weather is elevating the Fusarium head blight (FHB) risk for highly susceptible , flowering wheat.  Cool temperatures in the forecast may reduce FHB risk for flowering wheat in many areas. For an update on Fusarium head blight click here.


What foliar corn diseases are your biggest concerns?

There are many diseases that can impact Illinois #corn production, and several are caused by pathogens that impact the foliage.  When foliage is damaged by pathogens, carbon and nutrient delivery to developing/filling grain can be reduced, limiting yields.  Examples of foliar diseases include grey leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, southern and common rust, Diplodia leaf streak, bacterial leaf streak, Goss’s wilt, and tar spot.  Which foliar disease is the biggest issue for you?

To participate in a brief poll, click here


General information on plant disease management

We have posted some new materials (along with cool visual aids) on basics of integrated disease management.  Hopefully this information will be useful to you during this busy meeting season.  Click here to view this post.

 

Remember you can sign up for updates to the Illinois Field Crop Disease Hub

Dr. Nathan Kleczewski Extension Field Crop Pathologist UIUC


Efficacy vs management trials

With meeting season going full blast, you will be seeing a slew of data pertaining to disease management and the efficacy of various disease management products.  We posted some general tips to keep in mind at the Illinois Field Crop Disease Hub that can be viewed HERE.

Remember that you can sign up for Hub updates (Hubdates?) by entering your email information on the main page.

Nathan Kleczewski- Field Crop Plant Pathologist and Extension Specialist-UIUC


2019 Applied Research Results, Field Crop Disease and Insect Management now available

The 2019 edition of our annual report on applied research in field crop disease and insect management can be downloaded at the following link: https://uofi.box.com/v/2019PestPathogenARB

 

Each year, University of Illinois plant pathologists and entomologists produce a summary of the applied research we have conducted to inform disease and insect management practices in Illinois. This information provides a non-biased, third-party evaluation of control tactics such as pesticides and resistant varieties for use in corn, soybean, and wheat.

The 2019 report includes information on the following topics:

  • Surveys of insect pests and soybean cyst nematodes
  • Control evaluations for diseases of corn, soybean, and wheat (including southern rust, tar spot, fusarium head blight, and more)
  • Evaluations of Bt trait packages and soil insecticides in corn and foliar insecticides in soybean (including western corn rootworm, bean leaf beetle, dectes stem borer, and others)

image of the cover of the 2019 applied research report

For questions about the guide, please contact:

Nick Seiter, Field Crop Entomologist | nseiter@illinois.edu

Nathan Kleczewski, Field Crop Plant Pathologist | nathank@illinois.edu


UIUC Field Crop Extension Conferences- Sign up today!

What do you need to know for the 2020 growing season? The University of Illinois will address several key topics at four regional conferences around the state in January and February. The meetings will provide a forum for discussion and interaction between participants, University of Illinois researchers, and Extension educators.

Conference dates and locations are:
Jan. 22 DoubleTree by Hilton, Mount Vernon
Jan. 29 Brookens Auditorium at University of Illinois, Springfield
Feb. 4   I-Hotel, Champaign
Feb. 12 Kishwaukee College, Malta

2020 topics and presenters include:

“It’s Tough Out There: Supporting Farmers and Promoting Mental Health” by Josephine Rudolphi, U of I Department of Agricultural & Biological Engineering

“Illinois Weather Review: A Look Back at 2019 & Expectations for 2020 and Beyond” by Trent Ford, Illinois State Water Survey, State Climatologist

“How Should We Manage Today’s Corn Hybrids?” by Emerson Nafziger, U of I Department of Crop Sciences, Professor Emeritus

“Updates in Field Crop Disease Management” by Nathan Kleczewski, U of I Department of Crop Sciences

“The New Era of Herbicide Resistance… and You Thought the Last Era was Difficult” by Aaron Hager, U of I Department of Crop Sciences

“What’s the Real Deal with Cover Crops & Soybean Cyst Nematode?” by Chelsea Harbach, U of I Extension

Insect Management in Corn and Soybeans” by Nick Seiter, U of I Department of Crop Sciences

Hemp, What Have We Learned in 2019?” by Talon Becker (Mt. Vernon), Jessica Soule (Springfield), and Phillip Alberti (Malta, Champaign), U of I Extension

Certified crop advisers can earn up to eight hours of continuing education credit. Advance registration, no later than one week before each conference, is $100 per person. Late and on-site registration is $120. Register for the conferences online at https://go.aces.illinois.edu/IL2020CMC.

#illinois   #corn  #soybean  #wheat 

 

— University of Illinois Extension


Looking for Phyllachora samples on grasses- need your help!

Last year we started a project focusing on determining origins of Phyllachora maydis, the causal agent of tar spot of corn, in the United States.  As part of this project, we need to collect Phyllachora species from different hosts and areas.  Today I went for a lunchtime walk and was able to find Phyllachora spp. on four different grass hosts.  Note the large, somewhat raised stroma that follow the veins on most occasions.  They can have halos around them as well.  If you are walking fields, gardens, parks and happen to come across any putative Phyllachora, please send leaves and seed heads to the UIUC plant diagnostic clinic

Phyllachora stroma following the veins, which is somewhat typical for the genus.  N. Kleczewski

Phyllachora spp. on a senesced grass.  N. Kleczewski

Phyllachora spp. with halos around stroma.  N Kleczewski

at S-417 Turner Hall, 1102 S.Goodwin Ave. Urbana, IL 61801 ATTN Tar spot survey.  We really can use your help in this regard!

Nathan Kleczewski- Extension Plant Pathologist UIUC