Brownstown Agronomy Research Center Field Day – August 5, 2015

The 2015 Brownstown Agronomy Research Center Field Day, presented by the University Of Illinois Department Of Crop Sciences, will be held on Wednesday, August 5. Extension researchers and specialists will address issues pertinent to the current growing season. The tour will start at 8 a.m. and will last approximately three hours. It will be followed by lunch provided by U of I Extension. 2.5 hours of Certified Crop Adviser CEUs have been approved.

Shaded tour wagons will take participants to each stop. These topics will be addressed:

  • 2015 Cropping Season Challenges – Dr. Emerson Nafziger, U of I
  • Weed Management: The Simple Days are Over – Dr. Aaron Hager, U of I
  • Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome – Dr. Angie Peltier, U of I
  • Update on Statewide Insect Surveys & Potential Implications – Dr. Mike Gray, U of I
  • Factors Contributing to a Healthy Soil – Russ Higgins, U of I

The 208-acre Brownstown Agronomy Research Center has been conducting crop research on the claypan soils of southern Illinois since 1937. More than 30 research and demonstration projects are conducted at the Center each year. Visitors are always welcome.

The research center is located south of Brownstown on IL Route 185, approximately 4 miles east of the IL Route 40/185 junction.

For more information, contact Robert Bellm (618-427-3349); rcbellm@illinois.edu
Visit us on the web at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/barc/


2015 Season at the University of Illinois Plant Clinic

What pests will the 2015 growing season feature? Let the Plant Clinic help you diagnose them. Samples havePreview been gradually filling up the lab here at the Clinic in our 40th year of operation. On the field front, there have been concerns with root and virus disease diagnosis in wheat. On the home landscape front, there has been a steady influx of fungal disease.

 
The University of Illinois Plant Clinic accepts samples year-round. We are located in the Jonathan Baldwin Turner Hall building on the south end of the Urbana campus. Plant Clinic services include plant and insect identification, diagnosis of disease, insect, weed and chemical injury observation (chemical injury on field crops only), nematode assays, herbicide resistance testing for glyphosate and PPO inhibitors in pigweed, and help with nutrient related problems, as well as management recommendations involving these diagnoses. Microscopic examinations, laboratory culturing, virus assays, and nematode assays are some of the techniques used in the clinic. Many samples can be diagnosed within a day or two. Should culturing be necessary, isolates may not be ready to make a final reading for as much as two weeks. Nematode processing also requires about 1-2 weeks depending on the procedure. We send your final diagnoses and invoices to you through both the US mail and email. If you provide your email address on the sample form you will get your information earlier.

 
Please refer to our website http://web.extension.illinois.edu/plantclinic/ for additional details on sampling, sample forms, fees and services offered. If you have questions about what, where, or how to sample call us at 217-333-0519, leave a voicemail if you can’t get through. Whenever submitting a sample, provide as much information as possible on the pattern of injury in the planting, the pattern on individual affected plants, and details describing how symptoms have changed over time to cause you concern.

Our fees vary depending on the procedure necessary. General diagnosis including culturing is $15, ELISA and immunostrip testing is $25, Nematode analysis for SCN or PWN is $20, Specialty Nematode testing (such as corn) is $40. Please include payment with the sample for diagnosis to be initiated. Checks should be made payable to the University of Illinois or to the Plant Clinic. Companies can setup an account, call and we will accommodate you. Call if uncertain of which test is needed.

Photo 1:

Photo 1:Example of a great sample: Sample form, symptomatic plant, protected root ball and payment

Sending a sample thru US mail or delivery service address to:
University of Illinois Plant Clinic
1102 S. Goodwin, S-417 Turner Hall
Urbana, IL 61801

Email: We have a new email address plantclinic@illinois.edu. Use this address to send .jpg pictures to accompany your samples or to contact a diagnostician.

Drop off a sample:
You can also drop off a sample at S-417 Turner Hall. Park in the metered lot F 28 on the east side of Turner Hall or at the ACES library metered lot on the west side of Turner. Come in the South door. Take the elevator located in the SE corner of the building. Turn left when exiting the elevator; we are located along the SE corridor of the 4th floor. Please use the green drop box located just outside S-417 if we are temporarily out of the office.

Plant Clinic location, S-417 Turner Hall, 1102 S. Goodwin, Urbana IL 61801

Photo 2: Plant Clinic location, S-417 Turner Hall, 1102 S. Goodwin, Urbana IL 61801

Suzanne Bissonnette


Black Cutworm Moth Captures Common in Several Midwestern States

Impressive flights of black cutworm and armyworm moths have been reported by Doug Johnson an Extension Entomologist at the University of Kentucky . Entomologists at Purdue University also have received reports that black cutworm moth captures are now common in many areas of Indiana. Kelly Estes, Agricultural Pest Survey Coordinator with the Illinois Natural History Survey, has established a network of trapping cooperators across Illinois. Although no intense flights (nine or more moths caught over a 2-day period) of black cutworm moths have been reported by these cooperators, captures of this species have been common the past two weeks in the following counties: Champaign, Fayette, Logan, Lee, Macon, Macoupin, and Madison. This distribution of captures suggests that black cutworm moth flights have likely taken place throughout Illinois and growers are encouraged to remain vigilant for early signs of leaf feeding when corn seedlings begin to emerge. Today (April 21) strong winds from the south are undoubtedly bringing many black cutworm moths into Illinois and fields like the one featured in the photograph below will be prime targets for egg laying by this species.

Champaign County field considered a prime target for black cutworm moth egg laying, April 21, 2015.

 

For more complete information about the biology, life cycle, and management of black cutworms and armyworms, fact sheets are available from the Department of Crop Sciences, UIUC. Provided below is a brief overview of some key life cycle and management facts concerning black cutworms.

  • Black cutworm moths are strong migratory insects with northward flights commonly observed from Gulf States into the Midwest from March through May.
  • Moths are attracted to fields heavily infested with weeds such as chickweed, shepherd’s purse, peppergrass, and yellow rocket.
  • Late tillage and planting tends to increase the susceptibility of fields to black cutworm infestations.
  • Cutting of corn plants begins when larvae reach the 4th instar — with a single cutworm cutting an average of 3 to 4 plants during its larval development.
  • Cutting tends to occur most often during nights or on dark overcast days.
  • Fields at greatest risk to cutting and economic damage are in the 1-to-4 leaf stage of plant development.
  • An early warning sign of potential economic damage includes small pinhole feeding injury in leaves (caused by the first 3 instars).
  • A nominal threshold of 3% cutting of plants has traditionally been used as a point at which growers should consider a rescue treatment.
  • Not all Bt hybrids offer adequate protection against black cutworm damage. Growers should consult the Handy Bt trait table prepared by Dr. Chris DiFonzo at Michigan State University to determine the level of protection provided by their chosen Bt hybrid.

As the season progresses, if you learn of significant black cutworm infestations, please let me know and I will share this information with the readers of this Bulletin.

Mike Gray, Extension Entomologist


Spring Cover Crop Field Day March 26th – Ewing Demonstration Center

Join us on Thursday, March 26th, 2015 for the  Spring Cover Crop Field Day at the University of Illinois Extension Ewing Demonstration Center.  Registration will start at 8:30 a.m. and the program will begin at 9:00 a.m., rain or shine.  The Ewing Demonstration Center is located at 16132 N. Ewing Rd; Ewing, IL 62836, on the north edge of the village of Ewing, north of the Ewing Grade School on north Ewing Road.  Watch for signs.

Cover crops have many benefits to the soil, environment, and overall crop production and management.  Topics covered during this field day program include:

Challenges of Grazing Lush Spring Forage

–          Travis Meteer, Extension Educator, U of I Extension

Techniques for Planting into Cover Crop Residue

–          Mike Plumer, Private Consultant

Understanding the Soil Profile Beneath Your Feet

–          Bryan Fitch, Resource Soil Scientist, NRCS

Which One to Choose? Cover Crop Species Selection and Demonstration Trial Tour

–          Nathan Johanning, Extension Educator, U of I Extension

Some of the program highlights will be the demonstration trial planting of cover crops, including 17 different cover crops and combinations illustrating first hand the characteristics of the cover crops and what benefits they bring to your soil and crop production system.  Also, (weather and soil conditions permitting) we will have a soil pit dug, exposing the soil profile, where NRCS Resource Soil Scientist, Bryan Fitch will lead us through the characteristics of our southern Illinois soils to enhance understanding of the importance of a healthy soil.  Also Certified Crop Advisor CEU credits will be available (2.0 Soil & Water Management & 1.0 Crop Management) for the program.

This field day will be free and open to anyone interested in learning more about cover crops.  A light lunch will be provided and this is a great way to talk to fellow growers to learn more from their challenges and successes incorporating cover crops into their cropping systems.  Please call the Franklin County Extension Office at 618-439-3178 for more information and to register by March 24th.  We hope to see you there!


Ewing Demonstration Center Fall Cover Crop Field Day – Nov. 6th

Join us on Thursday, November 6th, 2014 for the the Ewing Demonstration Center Fall Cover Crop Field Day.  Registration and refreshments will start at 8:30 a.m. and the program will start at 9:00 a.m., rain or shine.  The Ewing Demonstration Center is located at 16132 N. Ewing Rd; Ewing IL 62836, on the north edge of the village of Ewing, north of the Ewing Grade School on north Ewing Road.  Watch for signs.

Cover crops have many benefits to the soil, environment, and overall crop production and management.  Topics included in this field day program are:

Establishment Challenges and Successes

– Robert Bellm, Extension Educator, University of Illinois Extension

Calibrating Success:  Drill and Planting Calibration

– Marc Lamczyk, Program Coordinator, University of Illinois Extension

Which One to Choose? Cover Crop Species Selection and Demonstration Trial Tour

– Nathan Johanning, Extension Educator, University of Illinois Extension

In addition, we also have a demonstration planting of cover crops established late this summer so you can view the growth and characteristics of the cover crops first hand and learn more what benefits they bring to your soil and crop production system.

This field day will be free and open to anyone interested in learning more about cover crops.  Please call the Franklin County Extension Office at 618-439-3178 for more information and to register.  We hope to see you there!


2014 Ewing Demonstration Center Fall Field Day

2014 Ewing Demonstration Center Fall Field Day

The University of Illinois Extension will host its annual Ewing Demonstration Center Fall Field Day on Thursday, September 11, 2014 at 9 a.m.  The Ewing Demonstration Center at is located at 16132 N. Ewing Rd; Ewing IL 62836, on the north edge of the village of Ewing, north of the Ewing Grade School on north Ewing Road.  Watch for signs.

The ongoing research plots this year consist of a soybean cover crops trial, LibertyLink soybean variety trial, insecticide/fungicide trial on soybeans, corn population study, drought tolerant corn hybrid evaluation, and new this year a pumpkin variety trial.

 

The topics to be discussed at Field Day include:

Fusarium Head Blight (Scab) and Vomitoxin Management in Wheat

  • Carl Bradley, Extension Specialist, Plant Pathology, University of Illinois Extension

Sky High Crop Scouting; Unmanned Aerial Drones

  • Dennis Bowman, Extension Educator, University of Illinois Extension

Alternative Forages and Harvesting Methods

  • Teresa Steckler, Extension Educator, Commercial Ag, University of Illinois Extension

Palmer Amaranth: Coming (Soon) to a Field Near You

  • Robert Bellm, Extension Educator, Commercial Ag, University of Illinois Extension

Cover Crops and Weed Management

  • Nathan Johanning, Extension Educator, Small Farms Local Foods, University of Illinois Extension

Refreshments will be provided by Franklin County Farm Bureau.

The field day is free and open to anyone interested.  A light lunch will be provided and registration is recommended by September 8, 2014 for an accurate meal count.

For additional information or to register, contact Marc Lamczyk at University of Illinois Extension Office in Franklin County at 618-439-3178 or lamczyk@illinois.edu.

 


Brownstown Agronomy Research Center Field Day – August 6

The 2014 Brownstown Agronomy Research Center Field Day, presented by the University Of Illinois Department Of Crop Sciences, will be held on Wednesday, August 6. Extension researchers and specialists will address issues pertinent to the current growing season. The tour will start at 8 a.m. and will last about two and a half hours. It will be followed by lunch provided by U of I Extension.

Shaded tour wagons will take participants to each stop. These topics will be addressed:

  • N Fertilizer for Soybean:  Where’s the Yield? – Jake Vossenkemper, U of I
  • Tillage is Recreational, Fertilizer is Essential – Dr. Rachel Cook, SIU
  • Field Crop Diseases & Fungicide Treatments – Dr. Carl Bradley, U of I
  • Corn Nematodes:  the Hidden Menace in Your Fields – Dr. Angie Peltier, U of I
  • Factors Contributing to a Healthy Soil – Troy Fehrenbacher, NRCS

The 208-acre Brownstown Agronomy Research Center has been conducting crop research on the claypan soils of southern Illinois since 1937. More than 30 research and demonstration projects are conducted at the Center every year. Visitors are always welcome.

The research center is located south of Brownstown on IL Route 185, approximately 4 miles east of the IL Route 40 / 185 junction.

For more information, contact Robert Bellm (618-427-3349); rcbellm@illinois.edu
Visit us on the web at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/barc/


July 15th Field Day at University of Illinois’ Research Center in Monmouth

The program is set for the 33rd annual University of Illinois’ Northwestern Agricultural Research Center Field Day. The program will begin at 8 am on Tuesday, July 15th.

Buses will carry members of the public to different stops in the research center where campus-based specialists or Extension personnel will present the results of crop and pest management research and current recommendations.

Topics and speakers will include:

  • Stewardship of dicamba and 2,4-D resistant soybean Mark Bernards—Assistant Professor of Agronomy, Crop Science, and Weed Control, Western Illinois University
  • On-Going Concerns Regarding Corn Rootworm Resistance to Bt Hybrids—Mike Gray— Extension Entomology Specialist, University of Illinois
  • Palmer Amaranth: Coming (Soon) to a Field Near You—Robert Bellm—Extension Educator, Commercial Agriculture, University of Illinois
  • Do Soybeans Need Fertilizer N? —Emerson Nafziger—Extension Crop Production Specialist, University of Illinois
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Sky High Scouting—Dennis Bowman—Extension Educator, Commercial Agriculture, University of Illinois

The Northwestern Illinois Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center is a 320 acre facility, established in 1980, 1 mile North and 4 miles West of Monmouth at 321 210th Avenue. Each year, more than 50 different projects are conducted by up to 12 campus-based project leaders and the center superintendent.

For more information about continuing education units to be offered visit the Hill and Furrow Blog or the Northwestern Illinois Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center website.

If you need a reasonable accommodation to participate in this program, please contact Angie Peltier (309) 734-5161, apeltier@illinois.edu.


Ready for Samples at the University of Illinois Plant Clinic

Welcome to another Diagnostics season! Samples have been steadily appearing this spring here at the Clinic in our 39th year of operation. On the field front, there have been concerns with virus disease diagnosis in wheat. On the home landscape front, there is a mountain of winter kill and windburn injury from the harsh winter just past.

The University of Illinois Plant Clinic began year-round operation in the fall of 2011. Our new location is in Jonathan Baldwin Turner Hall on the south end of the Urbana campus. During the winter, our hours are irregular due to trainings and winter meetings so call ahead. However, we resume regular business hours, 8am-12pm and 1pm-4:30pm, on Monday April 28th, 2014.

Example of a great sample: Sample form, symptomatic plant, protected root ball and payment

Plant Clinic services include plant and insect identification, diagnosis of disease, insect, weed and chemical injury observation (chemical injury on field crops only), nematode assays, and help with nutrient related problems, as well as management recommendations involving these diagnoses. Microscopic examinations, laboratory culturing, virus assays, and nematode assays are some of the techniques used in the clinic. Many samples can be diagnosed within a day or two. Should culturing be necessary, isolates may not be ready to make a final reading for as much as two weeks. Nematode processing also requires about 1-2 weeks depending on the procedure. We send your final diagnoses and invoices to you through both the US mail and email. If you provide your email address on the sample form you will get your information earlier.

Please refer to the Plant Clinic website for additional details on sampling, sample forms, fees and services offered. If you have questions about what, where, or how to sample call us at 217-333-0519. Whenever submitting a sample, provide as much information as possible on the pattern of injury in the planting, the pattern on individual affected plants, and details describing how symptoms have changed over time to cause you concern.

Our fees vary depending on the procedure necessary. General diagnosis including culturing is $15, ELISA and immunostrip testing is $25, Nematode analysis for SCN or PWN is $20, Specialty Nematode testing (such as corn) is $40.

Please include payment with the sample for diagnosis to be initiated. Checks should be made payable to the University of Illinois or to the Plant Clinic. Companies can setup an account, call and we will accommodate you. Call if uncertain of which test is needed.

Plant Clinic location, S-417 Turner Hall, 1102 S. Goodwin, Urbana IL 61801

Drop off a sample:

You can also drop off a sample at S-417 Turner Hall. Park in the metered lot F 28 on the east side of Turner or at the ACES library metered lot on the west side of Turner. Come in the South door. Take the elevator located in the SE corner of the building. Turn left when exiting the elevator; we are located along the SE corridor of the 4th floor. Please use the green drop box located just outside S-417 if we are temporarily out of the office.

Sending a sample thru US mail or delivery service address to:

University of Illinois Plant Clinic
1102 S. Goodwin, S-417 Turner Hall
Urbana, IL 61801

Social Media: We have a lot of ways to keep you up to date on what is happening at the Plant Clinic and about other plant and pest issues. Follow the U of I Plant Clinic on Facebook, YouTube or, Blogger.